Monday, 24 June 2013

accessible books - how to buy?

I was in a real, live bricks and mortar book store yesterday.  It was lovely - filled to the brim with new releases, classics, beautiful books of every shape, size and topic.  Tom had a party and I was determined to find a book for the birthday boy - not an easy task for somebody who isn't from an English speaking background.  The other limiting factor was my budget - there were some beautiful books I could have bought about dragons and other monsters, but they were over $30.  I thought perhaps a Lego book or a graphic novel would do, but they were the only two categories not filled by the shop owner.  He admitted that if he started with them, he didn't know where he would stop.  Fair enough, I thought, but what do you do if you want to hook people into reading and traditional books aren't an option?

I ended up with a cute 'Where's the Meerkat' book, that followed the 'Where's Wally' format with history tidbits travelling through time, but it wasn't really what I wanted.  It made me wonder though, how else to find accessible books, those that might not be mainstream but still needed by people.  How can we encourage a love of books - and reading - if we don't have literature to suit people's needs?  I guess it's a matter of jumping online and searching, however I'm also of the mind we need to buy local - I suppose this is where the mantra of buying local where possible applies.  I can understand shop owners not wanting to have shelves stocked with books people might not buy, but one or two from a couple of diffferent categories shouldn't make that much of a difference, surely?

Have you been in this situation before?  If so, what did you do?  Did you pick a cheap, plastic toy or find a quality book to encourage a lifelong love of reading?!

6 comments:

  1. I meant to buy it but forgot - but found a magazine a few weeks ago with all sorts of book reviews in it and I thought it was such a wonderful way to discover books that you mightn't read otherwise - particularly if you are buyin them online without the benefit of browsing through a book shop.

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    1. Sounds interesting, I like to keep book shop flyers to see what's interesting. Will have to do some searching online now that I'm aware of this issue...

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  2. Books with every single gift- always! I am a school librarian who spends hours browsing The Book Depository...
    I am waiting for an order of $800 worth of picture books based on maths concepts to arrive in NZ... I do spend thousands at local bookshops too , so do support local bookshops - Time Out in Mt Eden is the best! But you cannot beat the book depository for volume and variety - I look online and then get Time Out to order a lot for me too! Independent bookshops do better at the quirkier stuff than say Whitcoulls (but even they have improved dramatically!)
    Go to publishers websites too and the Good Reading magazine is a gem.
    Graphic novels for older boys who struggle to read are amazing - Book Depository - type in "Stone Arch" and loads of good stuff comes up!

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    1. Thanks Kimberley, you sound like an author's dream! I'm determined to fill the world with more books, rather than with more plastic tickety tackety stuff that lasts two minutes! I will have to put some time into searching and buy some books to have on hand when the kids are going off to parties.

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  3. Booktopia is an Australian owned company and have a really interesting website, worth looking at. Fishpond is NZ, I had thought it was Australian. Love Mum

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